H.R.2353 – Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act

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Week ending June 23, 2017

H.R.2353 – Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act

Brief

“H.R. 2353 would amend the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 and reauthorize secondary and postsecondary career and technical education (CTE) programs through fiscal year 2023. The bill would authorize the appropriation of $5.9 billion over the 2018-2022 period, and an additional $1.2 billion in 2023. Under the General Education Provisions Act, those authorizations would be extended automatically for an additional year through 2024.” – cbo

Section-by-section analysis

(Full text of H.R. 2353 at congress.gov)

Sponsor:  Rep. Thompson, Glenn [R-PA-5] (Introduced 05/04/2017)

Status: Passed House /

VOTES and FLOOR ACTION

HOUSE

On Passage: On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote

House Amendments:

Motion to recommit:

Text of the motion:

SENATE

On Passage:

Procedural Actions:

Senate Amendments:

COST AND IMPACT

Cost to the taxpayers:

CBO estimates that implementing H.R. 2353 would cost $4.4 billion over the 2018-2022 period, and about $4 billion after 2022, assuming appropriation of the authorized amounts.

Pay-as-you-go requirements:

Enacting the bill would not affect direct spending or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.

Regulatory and Other Impact: Data not available

Dynamic Scoring:   CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 2353 would not increase net direct spending or on-budget deficits in any of the four consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2028.

Tax Complexity:  Not applicable to this bill.

Earmark Certification:  Data not available

Duplication of programs: Data not available

Direct Rule-Making:  Data not available

Advisory Committee Statement: Data not available

Budget Authority: Data not available

Constitutional Authority:   Assumed.

 

More Bill Information:

Section-by-section analysis

Section-by-Section Analysis

The legislation is

organized into three titles: (1) Career and Technical Education

Assistance to the States; (2) General Provisions; and (3)

Amendments to the Wagner-Peyser Act.

Section 3. References

Clarifies the following amendments and repeals are, unless

otherwise stated, being made to the Carl D. Perkins Career and

Technical Education Act of 2006.

 

Section 4. Effective date

Sets effective date at January 1, 2018

 

Section 5. Table of contents of the Carl D. Perkins Career and

Technical Education Act of 2006

Amends the table of contents of the Perkins Act.

 

Section 6. Purpose

Amends the purpose of the law to include developing the

academic knowledge and technical and employability skills of

students who are enrolled in CTE programs and programs of

study.

 

Section 7. Definitions

 

The bill removes six definitions from current law including

“individual with limited English proficiency,”

“postsecondary education tech prep student,” “school

dropout,” “scientifically-based research,” “secondary

education tech prep student,” and “tech prep program.”

The bill changes or adds 24 definitions: “area career and

technical education school,” “career and technical

education,” “career guidance and academic counseling,”

“career pathways,” “CTE concentrator,” “CTE participant,”

“dual or concurrent enrollment,” “early college high

school,” “eligible entity,” “English learner,” “evidence-

based,” “in-demand industry sector or occupation,”

“industry or sector partnership,” “local workforce

development board,” “paraprofessional,” “out-of-school

youth,” “pay for success initiative,” “program of study,”

“recognized postsecondary credential,” “specialized

instructional support personnel,” “special populations,”

“support services,” “universal design for learning,” and

“work-based learning.”

Of the definitions added, 12 are aligned to definitions

contained in the ESSA or WIOA: “career pathways,” “dual or

concurrent enrollment,” “early college high school,”

“evidence-based,” “in-demand industry sector or

occupation,” “industry or sector partnership,” “local

workforce development board,” “paraprofessional,” “pay for

success initiative,” “recognized postsecondary credential,”

“specialized instructional support personnel,” and

“universal design for learning.”

 

 

Section 9. Prohibitions

 

Strengthens the existing prohibition on federal curriculum,

program, or allocation mandates to mirror the ESSA prohibitions

on incentivizing the adoption of any specific curriculum.

 

Section 10. Authorization of appropriations

 

Replaces such sums authorization with levels consistent

with the annualized change in the budget caps.

 

Title I–Career and Technical Education Assistance to the States

PART A–ALLOTMENT AND ALLOCATION

 

Section 111. State allocation

Increases the state reservation of funding from 10 percent

to 15 percent. Allows the funding to be used to support CTE

programs aligned with in-demand industry sectors or occupations

or for state-based innovation to provide states with greater

flexibility in determining how to allocate the funding and

allow them to target state-specific education and economic

needs.

Adds juvenile justice facilities to the list of state

institutions eligible for funding from the state leadership

account and clarifies that state institutions must be

correctional or educational. The bill increases the maximum

amount of leadership funding states are allowed to spend on

these institutions to 2 percent from 1 percent.

 

Section 112. Accountability

Streamlines existing performance indicators and brings the

indicators into alignment with ESSA and WIOA.

Secondary level:

Decreases the number of core indicators required at

the secondary school level from six to five: (1) the

percentage of CTE concentrators who graduate high

school; (2) the percentage of CTE concentrators who

meet the state-developed academic standards; (3) the

percentage of CTE concentrators who are employed, in

workforce preparation, military service, or

postsecondary education after graduation; (4) a state-

developed indicator of quality that includes one of the

following: the percentage of CTE concentrators who have

taken two courses in a single CTE program of study

receiving recognized postsecondary credentials, having

participated in work-based learning, or having obtained

postsecondary credits in their program of study; and

(5) the percentage of CTE concentrators who have taken

two courses in a single CTE program of study in CTE

programs leading to non-traditional fields.

Eliminates the requirement for schools to report on

student attainment of diplomas, GED credentials, or

proficiency credentials. Aligns the student academic

achievement and graduation rate indicators with the

requirements of ESSA. Replaces the problematic

technical skill proficiency indicator with a state-

determined quality indicator, which must include

student participation in work-based learning,

attainment of postsecondary credits through dual or

concurrent enrollment, or attainment of recognized

postsecondary credentials.

Postsecondary level:

Decreases the number of core indicators required at

the postsecondary level from five to four and aligns

these indicators to those under WIOA. The new, WIOA-

aligned indicators are: (1) student participation in

education, workforce preparation, or unsubsidized

employment after program completion; (2) the median

earnings of students in unsubsidized employment; (3)

and the percentage of CTE students receiving a

recognized postsecondary credential. The final

indicator is simplified to only consider the percentage

of CTE students in non-traditional fields.

Replaces the one-size-fits-all continuous improvement

requirement with the requirement that performance levels for

each indicator must be sufficiently ambitious to allow for

meaningful evaluation of program quality.

Eliminates negotiation with the Secretary on levels of

performance required in current law.

Aligns program reporting requirements with ESSA.

Requires the consideration of local economic conditions and

the ability of the local recipient to collect cost-effective

data in setting local levels of performance.

Clarifies that states are to establish their levels of

performance in a manner consistent with the procedure outlined

in the state plan.

 

Section 113. National activities

 

Eliminates the annual performance report.

Requires that the single plan for research, development,

dissemination, and evaluation be carried out by an independent

grantee. The Secretary must act through the Director of the

Institute for Education Sciences to evaluate CTE activities.

Adds representatives of special populations to the existing

independent advisory panel.

Provides the Secretary authority to issue demonstration

grants specifically designed to identify or support innovative

strategies and activities to improve career and technical

education and align workforce skills with labor market needs,

so long as such grants are aligned with the single plan.

Replaces “such sums” authorization with levels consistent

with the annualized change in the budget caps.

 

Section 114. Tribally controlled postsecondary career and technical

institutions

 

Replaces “such sums” authorization with levels consistent

with the annualized change in the budget caps.

 

Section 115. Occupational and employment information

 

Repeals section 118 of current law.

 

PART B–STATE PROVISIONS

 

Section 121. State plan

 

Clarifies the ability of states to submit a combined plan

together with the state workforce development plan submitted

under WIOA. Sets plan length at four years to align with the

WIOA combined plan.

Requires states to consult with stakeholders and allow for

public comment in developing the targeted performance levels

submitted as part of the state plan.

Streamlines the required contents of state plans from 52

items to 28 items.

Like in ESSA, requires the Secretary to approve a state

plan unless the Secretary deems the state plan fails to meet

the requirements of the Act, which includes the requirement to

set sufficiently ambitious levels of performance. The timeline

for the review of state plans is extended from 90 to 120 days.

 

Section 122. Improvement plans

 

Eliminates the authority of the Secretary to withhold

funding from the states for failure to meet 90 percent of their

adjusted levels of performance and instead requires states to

develop performance improvement plans, the development of which

the states are solely responsible. If a state fails to make

improvement on the indicator or indicators identified in the

improvement plan over the course of two years, the state must

revise the improvement plan to address the reasons for that

failure in consultation with state-based stakeholders. The

responsibility of the Secretary to provide technical

assistance, monitoring, and oversight related to the

implementation of the revised performance improvement plan is

reaffirmed. At the local level, improvement plans must be

developed in consultation with local stakeholders and states

have the discretion to determine how many years may pass before

revisions are required. Local grant recipients may request a

waiver from state agencies to waive the requirements of this

section, subject to approval by the state.

 

Section 123. State leadership activities

 

Streamlines the required and allowable uses of funds while

preserving state flexibility.

 

PART C–LOCAL PROVISIONS

 

Section 131. Local application for career and technical education

programs

 

Replaces the lengthy local plan in current law with a local

application including specific requirements.

Requires local recipients to consult with local

stakeholders to perform biennial needs assessments to determine

how the program is aligned with community needs.

The assessment is to be updated on an annual basis to

ensure the program is responsive to community employment needs

and allow for employer input.

 

Section 132. Local uses of funds

 

Streamlines the required and allowable uses of funds while

preserving local flexibility.

 

Title II–General Provisions

 

 

Section 201. Federal and state administrative provisions

 

Preserves the requirement that states maintain 100 percent

of fiscal effort, but provides additional flexibility by

allowing states to establish a new baseline of fiscal effort 10

percent below their current level.

Removes the previously required written request for private

school students to participate in CTE programs and activities

and expands the area for which local recipients can serve

private school students, subject to discretion of the local

agency.

Repeals Title II of current law and re-designates Title III

as Title II.

 

Section 219. Study on programs of study aligned to high-skill, high-

wage occupations

 

Requires a study on the strategies, components, policies

and practices used to assist students in pursuing programs of

study aligned to high-skilled, high-wage occupations, including

for populations underrepresented in those occupations.

 

Title III–Amendments to the Wagner-Peyser Act

 

 

Section 301. State responsibilities

 

Requires states to consult with Perkins eligible agencies

and provide such agencies with the information needed to meet

the needs of secondary and postsecondary school students.

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