H.R.806 – Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017

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Week ending July 21, 2017

H.R.806 – Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017

Brief

“H.R. 806 would delay the implementation of a final rule promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2015 related to ambient-air-quality standards for ozone emissions. That rule, published in the Federal Register on October 26, 2015, requires states to determine whether different geographical areas in the states are in compliance with federal limits on ozone pollution and to submit plans to reduce ozone emissions to the EPA starting in 2020. The bill would delay the requirement for states to submit those plans until 2026.” – cbo

The bill would extend the review cycle for certain pollutants from 5 years to 10 years and would authorize the EPA to consider the technological feasibility of pollution controls when setting standards for safe levels of those pollutants.

“Finally, the bill would require the EPA to conduct a study on the formation of atmospheric ozone and to submit a report to the Congress describing the extent to which foreign sources of air pollution affect the ability of states to comply with federal pollution limits under the Clean Air Act.” cbo

 (Full text of H.R. 806 at congress.gov)

Sponsor:  Rep. Olson, Pete [R-TX-22] (Introduced 02/01/2017)

Status: Passed Mousse /

VOTES and FLOOR ACTION

HOUSE

On Passage: On passage Passed by recorded vote: 229 – 199 (Roll no. 391)

House Amendments:

An amendment, offered by Ms. Castor (FL), numbered 1 printed in House Report 115-229 to halt implementation of the Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017 if the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee finds that application could increase health risks to vulnerable populations including children, seniors, pregnant women, outdoor workers, and minority and low-income communities. On agreeing to the Castor (FL) amendment; Failed by recorded vote: 194 – 232 (Roll no. 385)

An amendment, offered by Mr. Tonko, numbered 2 printed in House Report 115-229 to strike subsection (b) of Section 3, which would to allow EPA to consider technological feasibility when determining what level of pollution is safe On agreeing to the Tonko amendment; Failed by recorded vote: 182 – 241 (Roll no. 386)

An amendment, offered by Mr. Beyer, numbered 3 printed in House Report 115-229 to strike subsection (h) of section 3 (relating to exceptional events) On agreeing to the Beyer amendment; Failed by recorded vote: 191 – 235 (Roll no. 387)

n amendment, offered by Mr. Polis, numbered 4 printed in House Report 115-229 to close the loophole that prevents aggregating emissions from any oil or gas exploration or production well. Additionally, it seeks to require the EPA to add hydrogen sulfide to the list of hazardous air pollutants. On agreeing to the Polis amendment; Failed by recorded vote: 186 – 242 (Roll no. 388)

An amendment, offered by Mr. McNerney, numbered 5 printed in House Report 115-229 to strike section 6 of the bill. On agreeing to the McNerney amendment; Failed by recorded vote: 190 – 236 (Roll no. 389)

An amendment, in the nature of a substitute offered by Mr. McNerney, numbered 6 printed in House Report 115-229 to strike the underlying bill and replace it with a grant program to benefit regions with the poorest air quality

 

 

Motion to recommit: On motion to recommit with instructions Failed by recorded vote: 191 – 235 (Roll no. 390

Text of the motion:

The House proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the motion to recommit with instructions. The instructions contained in the motion seek to require the bill to be reported back to the House with an amendment to prohibit the application of the Act and amendments if the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee finds that the application of the Act and amendments could increase, with respect to Americans without access to health insurance, certain health impacts.

SENATE

On Passage:

Procedural Actions:

Senate Amendments:

COST AND IMPACT

Cost to the taxpayers:  Based on an analysis of information from the EPA, CBO estimates that completing those activities would cost $2 million over the 2018-2020 period; such spending would be subject to the availability of appropriated funds.

Pay-as-you-go requirements:  Enacting H.R. 806 would not affect direct spending or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.

Regulatory and Other Impact: H.R. 806 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal governments.

Dynamic Scoring:   CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 806 would not increase net direct spending or on-budget deficits in any of the four consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2028.

Tax Complexity:  Not applicable to this bill.

Earmark Certification:  Data not available

Duplication of programs: Data not available

Direct Rule-Making:  Data not available

Advisory Committee Statement: Data not available

Budget Authority: Data not available

Constitutional Authority:   Assumed.

 

More Bill Information:

 

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