H.R.3180 – Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018

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Week ending July 28, 2017

H.R.3180 – Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018

Brief

The bill aims to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2018 for intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the United States Government, the Community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes

“H.R. 3180 would authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2018 for intelligence activities of the U.S. government, the Intelligence Community Management Account (ICMA), and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System (CIARDS). The bill also would modify other programs across the intelligence community.

Under the bill funds are hereby authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 2018 for the conduct of the intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the following elements of the United States Government: (1) The Office of the Director of National Intelligence. (2) The Central Intelligence Agency. (3) The Department of Defense. (4) The Defense Intelligence Agency. (5) The National Security Agency. (6) The Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, and the Department of the Air Force. (7) The Coast Guard. (8) The Department of State. (9) The Department of the Treasury. (10) The Department of Energy. (11) The Department of Justice. (12) The Federal Bureau of Investigation. (13) The Drug Enforcement Administration. (14) The National Reconnaissance Office. (15) The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. (16) The Department of Homeland Security.

The President shall not publicly disclose the classified Schedule of Authorizations or any portion of such Schedule except (A) as provided in section 601(a) of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (50 U.S.C. 3306(a)); (B) to the extent necessary to implement the budget; or (C) as otherwise required by law.

Election Threats

The Director of National Intelligence, in coordination with the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Intelligence and Analysis and the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, shall make publicly available on an internet website an advisory report on foreign counterintelligence and cybersecurity threats to election campaigns for Federal offices. Each such report shall include, consistent with the protection of sources and methods, a description of foreign counterintelligence and cybersecurity threats to election campaigns for Federal offices; a summary of best practices that election campaigns for Federal offices can employ, in seeking to counter such threats; an identification of any publicly available resources, including United States Government resources, for countering such threats.

If the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Intelligence and Analysis jointly determine that an election campaign for Federal office is subject to a heightened foreign counterintelligence or cybersecurity threat, the Director and the Under Secretary, consistent with the protection of sources and methods, may make available additional information to the appropriate representatives of such campaign.

Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Director of National Intelligence, acting through the National Intelligence Manager for Threat Finance, shall submit to the congressional intelligence committees a report containing an assessment of the financing of threat activity by the Russian Federation.

The report under subsection (a) shall include, at a minimum, the following:

(1) A summary of leading examples from the 3-year period prior to the date of the report of any threat finance activities conducted by, for the benefit of, or at the behest of officials of the Government of Russia, persons subject to sanctions under any provision of law imposing sanctions with respect to Russia, or Russian nationals subject to sanctions under any other provision of law.

(2) An assessment with respect to any trends or patterns in threat finance activities relating to Russia, including common methods of conducting such activities.

(3) A summary of engagement and coordination with international partners on threat finance relating to Russia, especially in Europe, including examples of such engagement and coordination.

(4) An identification of any resource and collection gaps.

 

The term “threat finance” means—

(1) the financing of cyber operations, global influence campaigns, intelligence service activities, proliferation, terrorism, or transnational crime and drug organizations;

(2) the methods and entities used to spend, store, move, raise, or conceal money or value on behalf of threat actors;

(3) sanctions evasion; or

(4) other forms of threat financing domestically or internationally, as defined by the President.

The term “adversary foreign government” means the government of any of the following foreign countries:  North Korea. Iran. China. Russia. Cuba.

(Full text of H.R. 3180 at congress.gov)

SponsorRep. Nunes, Devin [R-CA-22] (Introduced 07/11/2017)

Status: Passed House /

VOTES and FLOOR ACTION

HOUSE

On Passage: On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Failed by the Yeas and Nays: (2/3 required): 241 – 163 (Roll no. 407)

House Amendments:

Motion to recommit:

Text of the motion:

SENATE

On Passage:

Procedural Actions:

Senate Amendments:

COST AND IMPACT

Cost to the taxpayers: CBO estimates that implementing the unclassified provisions of the bill would cost $520 million over the 2018-2022 period, subject to appropriation of the specified amounts.

In addition, enacting the bill also would affect direct spending by making changes to CIARDS that would enhance the benefits offered to certain annuitants; therefore, pay-as-you procedures apply. However, CBO estimates that those effects would be less than $500,000 over the 2018-2027 period

Pay-as-you-go requirements:  Data not available

Regulatory and Other Impact: H.R. 3180 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) and would not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal governments.

Dynamic Scoring:   Data not available

Tax Complexity:  Not applicable to this bill.

Earmark Certification:  Data not available

Duplication of programs: Data not available

Direct Rule-Making:  Data not available

Advisory Committee Statement: Data not available

Budget Authority: Data not available

Constitutional Authority:   Assumed.

 

More Bill Information:

 

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